Social psychological explanations of Prejudice highlight reasons how and why prejudicial thoughts and beliefs occur

Social psychological explanations of Prejudice highlight reasons how and why prejudicial thoughts and beliefs occur. Prejudice is often negative and unwarranted attitudes towards an individual based solely on the fact that they belong to a specific social group. According to Gordon Allport (1954), prejudice is derived from the Latin ‘praejudicium’, a judgement based on previous actions or decisions i.e. it is a “prejudgement”. (Allport, 1954) Prejudice can manifest itself through many forms in society. Sexism is one of the most widely publicised forms of prejudice today. Sexism is a bias that develops because of an individual’s gender. (Hogg ; Vaughan, 2014) In a 2012 study, biology, physics and chemistry professors were asked to analyse the applications of undergraduate science students applying for a position. All participants either received the application form of a male student or a female student. Participants were asked to rate the student’s competence, as well as the quantity of guidance and amount of salary they were willing to give. Results found male and female professors both determined that female students were seen to be less competent and less deserving of job offers, with reduced guidance compared to a male student of similar abilities. (Moss-Racusin, Dovidio, Brescoll, Graham, & Handelsman, 2012